Tini time is a tradition at our house.  That doesn’t mean everyone has a martini. Rather it is a time for whoever is around to enjoy being together and having snacks and a beverage of choice.  I concoct what they call a special drink for the kids, and for adults, quite often the choice is a martini which makes me think of how I learned to make one.

Years ago we were in London staying at the Duke’s Hotel  said to be known for its martinis. One afternoon while waiting for the hubby to return from a business meeting, I asked the bartender to instruct me in making the drink.

“So,” he says, “you want to know how to make the real thing rather than the minestrone soup you Americans seem to prefer?” Well, that response quieted me, and all I could do was nod in affirmation.  He then brought out  what is necessary, including an eyedropper.

The first requirement is to have the glass and gin both icy cold from having been kept in the freezer. Then approximately 2 ounces of gin is added to the glass along with a hint of vermouth (3-5 squirts from the eyedropper) and a lemon twist. Simple enough, wouldn’t you say?

According to my now expert, a martini is never shaken because the icy cold gin and glass provide just the right temperature and eliminates diluting the drink.  The lemon twist adds a complementary essence whereas olives or onions or whatever result in minestrone  soup.

Whether his technique is right or wrong depends, I guess, on one’s preference, but I’ve shared it with many a martini drinker who now keep gin and glasses in the freezer.  Some, however, can’t avoid adding an olive!

i so appreciate your visit and the comments you leave behind

8 thoughts on “Tini Time

  1. The minestrone soup version is my martini of choice, made with vodka rather than gin. I willing to try something new, though. Gin has never been my favorite spirit, but who knows? When you say “3-5 squirts” of vermouth, do you mean full squirts or 3-5 drops?

You make my day with your comments

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s